Havasupai, Grand Canyon

Last September, Mr. Mountain Man and I, along with my sister, made the ten mile trek to the beautiful Havasu Falls located in the southwest part of the Grand Canyon.  With the promise of beautiful blue water against a red rock backdrop, we set out with a week’s worth of supplies on our backs.  The trail began at Hualapai Hiltop, and traversed down through the canyon to the Supai Village.  Just beyond the village lay our destination, the campgrounds and all those gorgeous waterfalls.

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The trail wound down through the canyon, passing through wide gullies, under rocky ledges, and featured a surprising amount of green foliage.

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It took us about five hours to hike in, due to the fact that we were keeping a leisurely pace. I imagine the hike could be done in three and a half to four hours.

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Yes that is Mr. Mountain Man at the top of that pointy rock.  He’s a little bit crazy:)

We started our hike at about four o’clock in the morning in order to avoid hiking in high temperatures.

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The two rock formations overlooking the Supai village are known as “The Watchmen.”  The village consists of a general store, a cafe, a school, two churches, a clinic, a hotel, and the natives homes.  The village has all the modern conveniences like electricity, regular bathroom facilities, and and even fire hydrants.  Out at the campgrounds, there is no electricity, but there are convenient facilities that are actually mostly quite adequate.

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The scenery, oh the scenery!!  I have never been in a more beautiful place in all my life!  There are four different waterfalls; Havasu Falls, Mooney Falls, Beaver Falls, and Navaho Falls.  Beaver Falls is about four miles away, but the other three are quite close to the campgrounds.

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Navaho Falls

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The town had several extremely friendly dogs.  I got a kick out of seeing these dogs lying directly under this sign.  What do they expect, it’s not like the dogs can read:)

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We dined mostly on backpacking meals, but we did venture one day into the village for some lunch at the cafe and and ice cream bar.  The prices in the cafe and store were astronomical, however, when you consider the effort it takes to get supplies there, it’s more understandable.  We had done our homework on the trip, so we were prepared for the high prices.

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The beautiful Havasu Falls, I could’ve spend the whole four days just sitting here.

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Havasu Falls photographed from the trail above.

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Mooney Falls (It’s sort of hidden by the trees, but it is quite impressive.)

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Beautiful foliage on the floor of the canyon

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The trip was a smashing success!  I hiked almost 40 miles in four days (because of all the exploring we did).  The trip out was great, until I hit the last two miles.  Those switchbacks were excruciating!!  The trip is definitely doable for moderately active people, I would say even for kids above the age of eight or so.  For those who are not interested in the long backpacking experience, there is helicopter service to take you in and out (at about $80 each way).  We definitely plan to go back when our children are old enough to come along.  It was hands down, the best trip I’ve ever taken!!

This blog post has been written for SUYL Favorite Vacation Spots over at Kelly’s Korner.  Go check out all the other great destination ideas!

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My New Baby

Yesterday I got this.

(Image from Amazon)

I am totally in love!  I have been wanting a Canon Rebel for so long!  I’ve scoured store ads, Amazon, Ebay, and Craigslist for the best deals and badgered my poor husband about “that camera that I really want!”  Oh I am so excited.  Here are a few pictures that I snapped in full auto mode with no editing.  I figure if they look this good already, then I am going to have great fun figuring out what this camera is capable of.

 


The temptation to skip folding my laundry is going to be very great for awhile.  I could just photograph my piles of laundry in artistic ways instead.  After all, it’s for the greater good, preserving the arts and all!

Ice Storm

Here are a few pictures that I took from the recent ice storm that we had.

I thought this leaf looked so neat all encased in ice like that!

This bucket spoke to my sense of needing things to be even on all sides. I love how the icicles are all lined up with pretty much the same length except the corners!

This tree was stunning!  The picture does not do justice to how beautiful it was.  Every branch and twig on it was encased in ice.

Icicles hanging from a chair in the back yard.

Pa Ingalls cooking on the wood stove due to the fact that we had no power for two days. 

In the past five years, we have never lost power for more than about ten minutes.  During this storm, however, we were without lights for about two days.  It was kinda fun, but my girls were really out of sorts!  They aren’t used to going through life without all their electronic gadgets.  I did figure out that it is really easy to cook on my wood stove, and I have continued to do so a few times even though the power has been turned back on.  I figure why not try to save a little energy?  I wonder what the Zero Waste people would think of that? 🙂

Weekly Photo Challenge: Wonder

I wonder why the grass is green,

And why the wind is never seen?

Who taught the birds to build a nest,

And told the trees to take a rest?

 

Oh, when the moon is not quite round,

Where can the missing bit be found?

 

Who lights the stars, when they blow out,

And makes the lightning flash about?

Who paints the rainbow in the sky,

And hangs the fluffy clouds so high?

Why is it now, do you suppose,

That Dad won’t tell me if he knows?

I Wonder by Jeannie Kirby